Explaining 3rd Edition lore to die hard 2nd Edition players

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CTPhipps
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Hey,
I have a good opportunity to bring some 2nd Edition players into a game and who are massive lore buffs but they're completely unfamiliar with 3rd Edition. A status that I was until recently and I sadly didn't have much experience with Onyx Path when it started explaining all of this stuff as I was occupied elsewhere.

So, I have a big quest here.

Can someone help me explain how the setting is different in 3rd Edition? I'm fine rules wise but want to know more about the differences in presentation and character-wise. Nothing too obscure or too broad please.

I know it's a huge task but anything helps.

Edit:

Notable articles from this thread so far:

Impressions of Third Edition by Kashi

Differences in Edition by Blaque part 1

Differences in Edition by Blaque part 2

Rewinding the Clock by Aramithius

Dragonblooded in Third Edition by Blaque

The Brokenness of Creation by Blaque

Solars in Heaven by Kashi

Abyssals in Third Edition by Blaque

Infernals in Third Edition by Blaque

Lunars in Third Edition by Blaque

The Immaculate Philosophy by grod the giant

Magitech by Blaque

The Slug, Mnemon, and Roseblack by CT Phipps

The Slug, Mnemon, and Roseblack by Blaque

Dragonblooded vs. Patricians vs. Dynasts vs. Exalted by CT Phipps

Dynasts vs. Patricians by Blaque
Last edited by CTPhipps on Wed Feb 23, 2022 11:47 am, edited 4 times in total.

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AutXAutY
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Speaking as someone not very familiar with 2e, but with a passing familiarity and some familiarity with people talking about differences between them:

The main overall theme I can think of is de-emphasizing global threats and emphasizing personal/political struggles.
Eg, Neverborn as more abstract, impersonal, and directionless entities while the Deathlords take on more of the agency. Less emphasis on Yozis compared to demons, and when Yozis come up less emphasis on the possibility of them escaping Malfeas.

Some amount of trying to reduce settings elements people find offensive/repulsive (ie. some stuff from Ma Ha Suchi, probably Infernals chapters 1 and 2, Raksi eats fewer babies)

Map intended to have more empty space between named location, and to treat that empty space as more real (making named locations only have defined relationships if they are near each other). Adding new regions distinct from the 4 broad directions such as the Dreaming Sea - a sea in the Southeast, with several new cultures including a large semi-independent satrapy, and the Caul - a large island in the west with a lot of mysticism and a war between solars and lunars.

Removal of some of the dragonblooded-demeaning elements of the setting (a line somewhere about gods respecting mortals more than DBs because DBs can't exalt as solars, fewer things that DBs flat out can't do rather than being worse at than Solars)

Some change in emphasis of Lunars that are relatively subtle - modifications of how the Solar-Lunar bond is portrayed, removal of Thousand Rivers, modification of the Silver Pact
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Do you know what parts of 2e they latched onto?

The problem with talking about that edition is that it had no overall direction, there's people who liked Wonders of the Lost Age who were sold on Exalted as this post-apocalyptic sci-fi setting while comparatively Scroll of the Monk scratched a lot of people's wuxia itch. Did they like that their games gravitated towards some kind of world ending doom or did they feel compelled to deal with this stuff because nobody else would?
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AutXAutY wrote: Mon Feb 14, 2022 12:21 am Speaking as someone not very familiar with 2e, but with a passing familiarity and some familiarity with people talking about differences between them:

The main overall theme I can think of is de-emphasizing global threats and emphasizing personal/political struggles.
Eg, Neverborn as more abstract, impersonal, and directionless entities while the Deathlords take on more of the agency. Less emphasis on Yozis compared to demons, and when Yozis come up less emphasis on the possibility of them escaping Malfeas.

Some amount of trying to reduce settings elements people find offensive/repulsive (ie. some stuff from Ma Ha Suchi, probably Infernals chapters 1 and 2, Raksi eats fewer babies)

Map intended to have more empty space between named location, and to treat that empty space as more real (making named locations only have defined relationships if they are near each other). Adding new regions distinct from the 4 broad directions such as the Dreaming Sea - a sea in the Southeast, with several new cultures including a large semi-independent satrapy, and the Caul - a large island in the west with a lot of mysticism and a war between solars and lunars.

Removal of some of the dragonblooded-demeaning elements of the setting (a line somewhere about gods respecting mortals more than DBs because DBs can't exalt as solars, fewer things that DBs flat out can't do rather than being worse at than Solars)

Some change in emphasis of Lunars that are relatively subtle - modifications of how the Solar-Lunar bond is portrayed, removal of Thousand Rivers, modification of the Silver Pact

1) I don't agree. There were hooks for STs to use or not like Island 5. You can't take Return of the Scarelt Empress as the true story. No one accepts it, not even the writers and developers. Games could always do their own thing. Neverborn were always abstract, impersonal, and directionless. Deathlords always had their own agency to the extreme (after 1e).
Yozi never came up (outside RotSE) and it was always dealing with 1st and 2ed circles almost entirely.

2) Indian Jones and the Temple of Doom could never be made today and that's not a good thing. Raksi did not even eat babies because she needs to, it was a flex, a power play. Ma Ha Suchi is probably the best written and most complex Eldar Lunar of 2e and people always read shallow cliff-notes and misunderstand all of it. No body even bothers to try to get into the Lunar Elders heads, suffering in Pure Chaos (the boarder marches did not exist until the Balorian Crusade) and having their whole world and everything they'd build defiled. MaHa let Dace live and he treats his soldiers firmly but they report to him honestly, putting duty over fear.

3) The 3e map explores those places because 1e and 2e enabled them. It just builds on them. In so far as relationships between them, the 3e map is larger the Bronze Age world was very connected.

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Their perception of Exalted as near as I can tell was fully embracing the gonzo wackiness of the setting with the fact the Sun is a giant mecha, eldritch technology left all around, and the universe having wholly different physical laws than our current ones. Their view was the place was about to be destroyed by a hundred different apocalypse (Gem first, obviously) and the Incarnae were all trapped marathoning Halo.

(One of them insists that Games of Divinity is flat out a roleplaying game and all the more hilarious that they can't stop tabletop gaming--I agree, it's meta but works)
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I usually do not involve myself in discussions about 3E, but, as someone who uses 3E for the lore only, I will chime in with my two cents.

I don't see Third Edition as that much of a massive rewrite to the setting, personally. Mostly some subtle tweaks and deemphasis as a few have mentioned with a few big exceptions.

Deemphasis on magitech might be the sticking point with some die hard 2E players, which is a plus to me. I hate magitech. It's fine in small doses, but became endemic in 2E.

The most drastic overhauls that I have seen come so far is from the Lunars. For example, making most of the Lunar elders actually useful mentors instead of batshit insane is pretty good (although Raksi still eats the occasional baby as a really weird flex that I still don't like). I never gave a damn about the Thousand Streams River projects. It always seemed kind of...like trying to use a garden hose to fight a forest fire; nor did I like that the Lunars fled or hid themselves. Manipulating something from behind the scenes seems very...Sidereal. Having the Lunars as basically the open lords of the Threshold is much better to me.

The only thing that bugs the absolute shit out of me is, and admittedly it is very minor and requires only a house rule to fix, is for some reason that is totally beyond me, the Devs kept the damn reforging of the Lunar castes for literally no reason other that some vague line about the old ones were unsuited for the Age of Sorrows. Right.... You can fight the Primordials with them okey dokey, but they are unsuited for the Age of Sorrows?

Of course, I might be salty about this because one of the only questions I ever asked the Devs was their thoughts on what the old Lunar caste's powers were and I pretty much got told to go away. So, c'est la vie.

PS: I also HATED the Mecha Sun. Good Lord. Glad that is gone as far as I know.

PPS: I'm having a heck of a time posting anything from my computer. Everytime I try I get logged out. I had to do this on my phone. Anyone know what that's about?
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I admit I love the mecha sun because I'm assuming it's a reference to Greek Mythology with Helios and his chariot. It's just dialed up to the 11 because it's Exalted.
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CTPhipps wrote: Mon Feb 14, 2022 7:04 am I admit I love the mecha sun because I'm assuming it's a reference to Greek Mythology with Helios and his chariot. It's just dialed up to the 11 because it's Exalted.

I can get behind that I suppose. I, on the other hand, just saw it as the apotheosis of the magitech plague. That is one of the things I do like about at least 1E and 2E is Exalted was very much open to debate. It also accounts for its.... passionate fan base. Speaking of Greek mythology, I do very much prefer my Exalted (YMMV of course) to reflect the old cheesy Hercules TV opening as "a time of myth and legend, when the ancient gods were petty and cruel, and they plagued mankind with suffering. " But, you know, with surfboard swords.

EDIT: Also, shameless plug for my 1E, 2E and 3E all in one map that might help some 2E players by giving them places they recognize. 
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The biggest thing for me is that has far fewer named explanations, rewinding the clock to 1E on quite a few things.

As an example, take the treatment of Gethamane in all 3 editions:

1E - Place founded in the First Age and rediscovered by reguees in the Second. Place with temples that make people dream strange dreams, become caretakers of the place and had underground fungus farms.

2E - Place founded as a nation of reality in the First Age, housing reality engines as a backup to the Imperial Mountain, a sleeping Fair Folk behemoth under the temple complex that Wales and splaughters a local population of Mountainfolk every so often, and a gate to Yu-Shan.

3E - Place founded in the First Age and rediscovered by reguees in the Second, who brought their own gods with them and found none there already. Place with temples that make people dream strange dreams, become caretakers of the place and had underground fungus farms, which the dead are used to fertilise.

The lack of named explanations bad to me to be a choice to bring back the mystery of the setting. In some cases this may simply be because we don't have many 3E supplements, but in some cases it works and makes things more useful and independent, meaning it's easier to tell those smaller stories without 3 being so connected to the larger things in the setting. On the other hand, in some cases it just restates stuff slightly differently without really changing anything. For example, the war between the gods and the Primordials still happens in 3E, but the Primordials are never named, just being the "enemies of the gods".
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Kashi wrote: Mon Feb 14, 2022 6:43 am The only thing that bugs the absolute shit out of me is, and admittedly it is very minor and requires only a house rule to fix, is for some reason that is totally beyond me, the Devs kept the damn reforging of the Lunar castes for literally no reason other that some vague line about the old ones were unsuited for the Age of Sorrows. Right.... You can fight the with them okey dokey, but they are unsuited for the Age of Sorrows?

Of course, I might be salty about this because one of the only questions I ever asked the Devs was their thoughts on what the old Lunar caste's powers were and I pretty much got told to go away. So, c'est la vie.
 I'm sure I've heard somewhere that their Primordial War Castes were different again.
 
I do understand the frustration. For me it's because it's on the verge of being an interesting idea but then not elaborated upon. There's several areas of the lore where I applaud Ex3 for stepping back from providing too much detail but a few places where it arbitrarily doesn't give a straight answer that makes it harder to defend the better decisions. 
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Kashi wrote: Mon Feb 14, 2022 6:43 am The only thing that bugs the absolute shit out of me is, and admittedly it is very minor and requires only a house rule to fix, is for some reason that is totally beyond me, the Devs kept the damn reforging of the Lunar castes for literally no reason other that some vague line about the old ones were unsuited for the Age of Sorrows. Right.... You can fight the Primordials with them okey dokey, but they are unsuited for the Age of Sorrows?

I don't think the Lunar castes where seen as insufficient for the Age of Sorrows, they were seen as unsuited. The skillset you need to fight Primordials is different than the skillset you need to fight the Realm, because the Realm is different from Primordials.

Also, there possibly was an intermediate set of castes for the First Age distinct from Primordial War Era Castes and Age of Sorrows Castes - the text suggesting this isn't explicit but "remaking themselves for an Age of Dreams. Though never forsaking the divine monstrosity at their Essence’s heart, they became guardians, guides, world-walkers, judges, and mystics." sounds sort of like a new set of castes (or possibly a first set of castes, it's possible all primordial-war Lunars were casteless)

It's still not explained what specific skills where emphasized/deemphasized, and the lack of detailed descriptions of previous castes makes it hard to guess, but Changing Moon does strike me as more deception-based than pure social, while "guardians, guides, world-walkers, judges, and mystics" sounds more cooperative/leadership/organizationy, and "They waged war in the shapes of snakes as long as rivers, all-devouring swarms bearing devil-slaying plagues, beast-mothers with tusks like daiklaives and stampedes of murderous children, and countless other wild horrors." sounds less social and more shapeshifting focused.

It sort of makes sense than in the Primordial War, when most of the enemies were souls of the main enemies, deception is less useful compared to violence, and in the First Age, when Lunars could openly be part of the most powerful organizations in the world, deception was less useful.

Also, in the First Age it's likely that Lunars believed that many of the people a deceptive Lunar would deceive would be other Lunars, while in the Age of Sorrows Lunars have a common enemy.
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Lioness wrote: Mon Feb 14, 2022 3:44 pm  I'm sure I've heard somewhere that their Primordial War Castes were different again.


That is referenced in the 3E Lunar book at the start.
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Lioness wrote: Mon Feb 14, 2022 3:44 pm
I'm sure I've heard somewhere that their Primordial War Castes were different again.

I do understand the frustration. For me it's because it's on the verge of being an interesting idea but then not elaborated upon. There's several areas of the lore where I applaud Ex3 for stepping back from providing too much detail but a few places where it arbitrarily doesn't give a straight answer that makes it harder to defend the better decisions.


Some of my bigger problems with 3E in a nutshell. An over correction for the perceived over explaining of 2E.

That and the baffling dearth of setting resources. I'd have been churning out PoD setting books for places like the Dreaming Sea and all of the new places added to the map. Doesn't need to bother with mechanics (it'd probably be a better seller if it had none). Just give me setting seeds.
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Kashi wrote: Mon Feb 14, 2022 11:52 pm
Lioness wrote: Mon Feb 14, 2022 3:44 pm
I'm sure I've heard somewhere that their Primordial War Castes were different again.

I do understand the frustration. For me it's because it's on the verge of being an interesting idea but then not elaborated upon. There's several areas of the lore where I applaud Ex3 for stepping back from providing too much detail but a few places where it arbitrarily doesn't give a straight answer that makes it harder to defend the better decisions.


Some of my bigger problems with 3E in a nutshell. An over correction for the perceived over explaining of 2E.

That and the baffling dearth of setting resources. I'd have been churning out PoD setting books for places like the Dreaming Sea and all of the new places added to the map. Doesn't need to bother with mechanics (it'd probably be a better seller if it had none). Just give me setting seeds.

So this assume setting material doesn't take any longer to write than mechanics. While there isn't a playtest step, there's still a similar amount of wordcount involved. And due to the way that writing locations are, making sure you can write it consistently, in a unified voice, and to avoid some of the pitfalls that 2e had of like...not crossing notes, does slow things down some. Note that The Realm is nearly all setting and did take a bit. And the upcoming Across the EIght Directions is like...as big as th enew Dragon-Blooded book. That takes time to write, edit, develop, cross-reference, and layout and art. I mentioned this in the release schedule thread a bit. And 2020 and the hellscape it inflicted on us all since has kind of not done favors there.

But that is coming at least, and it will probably do a big job on filling in things.
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So, before anything else, I usually recommend folks interested in contrasting the different editions take a look at the Storyteller Vault Style Guide. It's actually an official document made by OPP with guidelines for stuff for that program. It notably has (to me) a good summary of the different editions and what they emphasize differently. I think that it's worth noting is that (to me at least), 1e needs to be considered a bit too. As 2e was different from that, and 3e has its own takes on things from both.
Exalted Storyteller's Vault Style Guide

There's a few things different, some small and some big. And how much they really matter depends. But some of the ones that to me stood out:

Map Stuff
This one is kind of obvious. The map is bigger, with the areas that were the bounderies of previous edition's world being pushed back. At the same time, individual polities are going to generally be smaller. Save for the Realm and empires like Prasad or Coral, most polities are smaller in size than in previous editions. With the three notable map-eaters of prior editions (Harborhead, Haslanti, and Halta) being notably compressed form before based on what we know so far.

Kind of something that happened in late 1e and throughout 2e is that the places listed in the earlier 1e books became kind of "fossilized". Save for An-Teng, and some of the spots intorduced in 2e's North, a lot of the locations described in early 1e became less a suggesiton and more the definitive list of locations. This resulted in the various poliites interacting with one-another a lot, often at pretty ridiculous distances. The 3e route has been to have many of these polities instead interacting directly with neighbors not shown on the map before, plus showing more new while at it, and that these locations are being shown often as being interesting or exotic themselves. This makes the map generally feel like things are far-away (since they don't even talk about things thousands of miles away often), and also helps to showcase that you can fill in the map as you want. Basically re-introducing a bit of the "you can add things" to the game there. This is disucssed a lot more in the Style Guide above.

Also in this context, the corners of the map are being treated like Directions in themselves, hence the title of the upcoming Across the Eight Directions. And the Blessed Isle in 3e is bieng presented more as a venue for non-DB play, with a lot of work done to make it have more diversity in landscape, history, and environments of play, mainly by making it kind of a microcosm of the world at large, with a wetter West, drier South, fertile East, etc., but filtered through the constrianing and stablizing power of the Imperial Mountain.

This combined with the less apocalypses means that there's kind of more "room" for stuff in the middle. You can fit entire empires in there. You can have your mountain-sized wandering behemoths smashing cites. But Creaiton is big. It has room for that shit to happen while you conquer a landmass fitting of Ghenghis Khan. And in you forging something that great, you show more a result than if it's assumed that folks in Wavecrest even know what Chanta is.

Might of the Realm
Big thing in context of less existential global disasters is that the Realm falling over is a bigger empahsis. The 3e Realm is powerful, emphasizing the raw might thousands of Exalts can have on the setting and the reach it has. This serves to showcase the might of the Dragon-Blooded, the power of the Lunar Exalted that against such odds they have held out and could cut off parts of the Realm in their war, and also I think some of what I note later on infrastrucutre and institutions and how that is power in itself. The Realm is also shown as being not just a Bronze Faction puppet, which I like. The Empress and the Mouth of Peace worked with Chejob, but he seems to have had to work through them like how a CIA agent has to work with local rulers or contacts, more than the mind-whammied stuff the Mouth of Peace got in previous editions.

And with no "Ebon Dragon breaking out" stuff, the Realm's eminent Civil War gets a lot more attention. We also see a lot more satrapies described, with an emphasis to showcase that they aren't boring nothing states, but could be interesting and exotic locals themselves. And that the Realm collapsing again, means global catastrophe that is a lot more human in nature and conflict, though supernatural stuff can sneak in and cause issues.

The Realm in 3e is also in general I think rather well thought-out compared to previous editions, building on and adjusting a lot based on I think a general better understanding of government systems than was available to authors in 2000 when the 1e book was being written.

Another notable change here is the Realm's timeline is actually a bit different. We have clearer dates on when various Great Houses came and went, and some notable changes on the foundings of Houses Nellens, Sesus, and Ledaal, as well as the fall of House Iselsi being a much more recent occurrence.

Bread is Made: The First Age and the Exalted Host
First, in 3e the First Age was longer (5,000 years before the Usurpation happened). Something 3e is emphasizing a lot more is that the First Age was a long time ago. Even if Exalts can live centuries, that still is centuries, and folks still Exalt over that time and such. This is important in context of the Solars and the Usurpation. Unlike 2e, which spent a lot of wordcount on how Dragon-Blooded weren't fit to rule, and that a lot of the First Age as Solars and their cheerleaders, 3e emphasizes the First Age as being a joint effort, with the Deliberative having only ever been called the First or Second Delbieratives (not Solar) and that a lot of the greatness of the Age was a result of the Host as a whole working together with Solar Exalted acting as a catalyst almost. The Usurpation's unique factor was the effective extinction of the Solars, and that the groups left were split along Exalted lines rather than other cliques. So you have a long interagnum, where everyone's fighting, and the group that can usually glue it back together is effectively gone.

This is the "bread is made" factor. Lunars went into survival and war against the Shogunate for their own sake, not so much "The Solars were gone". The Shogunate and its successors as a whole, had Solars handled and dealt with. Anathema were dangerous, but Solars were a memory. And the Sidereals were more unified in the Usurpation itself, and whatever the Gold was in effect stopped existing. What we have now calling itself the Gold Faction is a newer clique using the older name. Think how many times the Black Hand has been used in history.

In this context too I think this highlights elements of the fact that the late Second Debliberative while not a One World Government, had an international system that probably looked like ours when it still worke dmore. And as we see now with the breakdown without a global junta and subsquent dual apocalypses, not a lot can be rebuilt like 2e thought. I think 2e bought in a bit on the whole "Single genius makes things" mindset, while 3e emphasizes infrastrucutre, resources, and lines of supply to do big projects. You don't get an industrial revolution wihtout a global revolution so to speak. And htere's nto a lot of globe.

I think in this context there's also a bit less of the line interested in the text interrogating the Usurpation's morality. Mianly to reintroduce the early 1e questions of "Where does right to rule even come from for Solars", bringing up the complications of revolution and coups, and how once you did a thing, second-guessing is a bit hard to do. I kind of get a feeling the emphasis that Deathlords as a result of the Usurpation and the Contagion subsequently being a chain of blaem on Sidereals for the diminished world is also not going to be there as much. Kind of with that, I think that Solar power level being less omnipotent means that like....okay, if the Exalted Host as is could barely handle it, it probably couldn't handle it with Solars either. And this is assuming you didn't get another Interagnum but with Solars rather than the Shogunate. The Usurpation happened, the Contagion happend cneturies later. What could have been is moot: What happened nex tis what's important.

Nature of Exaltation Broadly
A big shift from 2e to 3e is kind of ditcihing some of 2e's assumptions on Exaltation. Some of the ways Exaltation worked in 2e stemmed from assumptions of the Incarna and their relation to their creaotrs that don't need to be the case. "Exaltations are autonomous so gods can't be told to stop Exalting" assumes, for example, gods can be told to stop Exalting. The Geas as presented in 1e was with an idea that humans are mistletoe. That remains the case, but the Geas was "Gods can't hurt the titans" not "When a titan told a god to jump, the god had ot ask how high." Similarly, there's a bit of an emphasis where Exaltation while of the Incarna, does have some of the "Can't be another way." THe Sun didn't make 1,000 Dawns because whatever the case, how he Exalts folks results in the number of Exalts we have as they are. The Exaltation reflects the god Exalting, but that god doens't tailor make it.

There's also a return to the 1e take that Exalted are Chosen by the gods as like, actually the case. There might be specifics they like to ho they Choose, but even the Dragons do pick people so long as there's the Blood to ignite. On the whole "Why does the Sun Exalt bad people?" the general result is going to be probably "He made a mistake in hindisght" is my guess. He's powerful but he's not flawless.

There's also the introduction of the Law of Diminishment, where Exaltation takes something out of the Exalter. This is mostly empahsized with the new Exigents, which take soemthing out of the god to Exalt. They also showcase the "Exaltations aren't designed" bit. The Flame of Exigence isn't a blank Exaltation: It allows the god to Exalt in a way fitting thier nature and themes. It's a catalyst that the god lends power to get soemthing new. The Incarna, Dragons and other luminous beings just do it at scale in a way most lesser gods can't.

There's also a bit less an emphasis that the Exalted had a "natural" order built into them. The Solars and Lunars fought for dominance after the War of the Gods and settled more on "Joint rulership bloc" which later resulted in the new Lunar Castes and the Bond emerging organically. Dragon-Blooded were officers, not foot soliders, in the armies of the gods, which included a lot of humanity in general. And after the war, rather than Solars getting cart blanche rulership of Creation, everyone kind of carved it up as they wanted, incluidng Dragon-Blooded dynasties which setup their own kingdoms and polities. Sidereals worked with Heaven detached from a lot of this. There's a lot more emphasis that where things fell is not how it had to be, and that there's not some "natural order' that is being worked against which is why the world is like it is. It is like it is because the above "bread is made" situations and humans being humans.

Magitech Stuff
Big thing here is that magitech in 2e was like, not what it was in 1e. The big thing in 3e is that it didn't get rid of magitech. What it did is get rid of the idea that magitech aesthetic artifacts are inherently better. In 2e, fancy weapons and armor were magitech,a s were almost every vehicle. In 3e, if your daiklave has cables dangling out and leaves phosphorous burns everywhere, that's just its Evocations. If your armor generates a smoke filed and fire claws, it doesn't need to have the magitech aeshtetic to do it. And if it does...it isn't a special category for being so. In 2e, the way magitech kind of was "anything with moving parts" it kind of ate a bunch of things that weren't magitech before in 1e. In 3e, the main thing is that just...it doens't need to be its own category. And some of the ntoable like "magical infrastructure' is that, infrastructure. And a lot of the world can't support it.

Now there is osme areas it is de-emphasized. Lookshy focuses much more on having three thousand Exalts than it does on its arsenals, but he arsenals are still there. It doesn't need Skywolf to be dominant, or entire talons of dudes on power armor. Basically it's htere, but it's more elite, and the textbox in the 1e book about diminsihing arenals is taken into account, rather than assuming Lookshy can just pump out things. This is just kind of straight-up Exalted reverting to 1e's take more than anything and even then I think there's more than 1e had as a whole.

As a whole, I see Creation in 3e as being a lot more late antqiuity by default than 2e wa assuming the Time of Tumult is. But I also think 3e a a whole has a lot of folks hwo really, really like real world history writing for it and such. This results I think in alot of the bright, colorful, intersting bits of society in that technological context being emphasized, with a layer of magic and artifice that is present, but doens't undo that feel.

There's more on specific Exalt types, gods, demons, the Fair Folk, the Immaculate Philosophy, and such to go over, but it's late and such. BU thtose to me are some big ones that to me at least did affect how I see the settings and the feel I go for approaching htem.
Last edited by Blaque on Mon Sep 05, 2022 2:58 am, edited 1 time in total.
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